Identifying and facilitating learning and change

Center for Coaching And Mentoring, Inc.

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How To Get The Most From Your Coach

Much has been written on how to be a good coach as well as numerous certification programs for coaches are available. Little attention has been paid to understanding what the other person does that contributes to a productive coaching relationship. During 2012 we posted a survey on our internet site to better understand what the other person can do to get the most from their coach.

One hundred and thirty two individuals responded to the importance of twenty-four behaviors on the part of the other person. The response scale was:

1= Unimportant
2= Of little importance
3= Moderately important
4= Important
5= Critical

The average response for all twenty-four behaviors in descending order:

Other Persons Behavior:

Average

Communicate openly and honestly

4.45

Listen to their feedback

4.39

Be open and transparent

4.39

Clarify both parties expectations up front

4.35

Focus on goals

4.29

Keep the commitments made to your coach

4.26

Trust your coach

4.19

Be accountable for actions and results

4.19

Decide to make the most of your coach

4.13

Have reliable information on your performance in the important competencies for your position

4.10

Select a coach who can help develop the competencies required for your position

4.10

Identify the competencies required for exceptional performance in your position

4.06

Work through tough issues

4.06

Regularly and formally assess progress

4.00

Identify 2 to 3 projects where you can apply the competencies you and your coach are working to strengthen.

3.97

Act on their feedback

3.97

Stay curious

3.94

Develop a game plan

3.94

Use them as a sounding board

3.87

Don�t pre judge the suggestions until you have tried

3.87

Test their suggestions

3.81

Perfect practice makes perfect

3.74

Encourage real time observations of you at work

3.74

Role play challenging situations you are facing

3.68

What is surprising is that fourteen of the behaviors were rated 4.00 or greater and that the lowest behavior was rated 3.68 or between Moderately Important and Important. The most important behavior for these participants was: Communicate openly and honestly. This was followed by Listen to their feedback, Be open and transparent, Clarify both parties expectations up front, and Focus on goals.

An argument could be made that all these behaviors are important however if the other person wanted to concentrate on a few, the top five would be a great place to focus. If these five behaviors were a part of every coaching interchange between the coach and the other person, the relationship would be very productive and rewarding for both parties.


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Contact Matt Starcevich at matt@coachingandmentoring.com